Jenn Budd: Former US Border Patrol Agent

Jenn Budd, a former senior patrol agent for the US Border Patrol, met with us earlier this month.

Jenn’s life as a border patrol agent turned around completely when she began to speak out at Campo BP Station regarding the drug smuggling operation that her boss organized. She found herself alone, at 3AM, in a hail of gunfire after being commanded to patrol the area where she had seen drugs coming in. The occurrence of this gunfire and her orders to be there lead to her being offered a higher position at sector headquarters, in exchange for her silence.

She turned her badge and weapon in the next day. “You have to sell your soul at one point to just do the job.”

Today, her life consists of speaking out against those agencies that have harmed asylum seekers/migrants/immigrants, speaking out against an administration that has created a crisis via policies, volunteering at a shelter in San Diego, writing for Souther Border Community Coalition, and an ambassadorship for Define American (a “nonprofit media and culture organization that uses the power of story to transcend politics and shift the conversation about immigrants, identity, and citizenship in a changing America.”) The full interview we have with her is a developing video piece.

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Building Community: Contra Viento Y Marea (Against All Odds)

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Ernesto winds down from the day at Contra Viento y Marea Comedor. He arrived in Tijuana on November 21st, 2018 with the migrant caravan that left Honduras on October 21st. He had always wanted to excel in his education, but the current state of his country did not have that opportunity for him. In his words, “Falta de oportunidades de estudio, porque soy un joven que busca oportunidades de superarme.” At first, he was seeking asylum in the United States; as time went on and more people were being denied and deported back to Central America, he decided to not pursue further for fear of returning to his homeland.
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Contra Viento y Marea, a community space in Tijuana, emerged from a series of repressive government acts against the migrant/asylum seeking community. The full story can be read on their website “contravientomareatj.com”. Today, it serves as a community diner, shelter, and community center. There is a garden on the roof, alongside a few tents where volunteers, migrants and collective-members reside.
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Tents pitched on the roof. The growing number of asylum seekers, migrants, and volunteers has turned the roof space into an area for residency as well as gardening.
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The start of a garden on the roof of Contra Viento y Marea. Volunteers from Jardin Lemniscata and the Contra Viento y Marea collective have started this gardening effort with the goal of “integrating the individual with the ecosystem to foment sustainable practices that prevent the unconscious, unmeasured growth of urbanization.”
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A hallway Inside Contra Viento y Marea. Artwork by @ashlukadraws on Instagram.
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A volunteer at Contra Viento Y Marea sweeps the floor after dinner is served at the communal kitchen/shelter space.
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Flowers grow among the concertina wire next to the border wall at Friendship Park.
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On the beaches at Playas De Tijuana, the border wall sits, corroded. “No obstacle can stop us from reaching our dreams. We are Mexicans. We are unstoppable.”
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A tattered art piece, that used to be an American flag, stays tied to the border wall. Reinforcement that was installed on the US side in March, can be seen behind the bottom half of the flag.

Where They Walk: Scouting A Migration Trail With Border Angels

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A gate with a bullet-ridden sign marks the trailhead for a path in the desert. People migrating from south of the border pass through here.
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A cross and water gallon sit in the desert along the path as symbols for hope & life.
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Perched on a rock, a first aid kit, toe warmer and tampons wait to be used.
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US military presence at the border. Concertina wire being installed on the wall. Half a mile down, the wall stops.

Photo Series: Documenting A National Emergency

With the declaration of a “national emergency” from the White House, we set out to find out what that looks like on any given day.

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The view through the border fence on Playas De Tijuana, looking towards San Diego, during the National Emergency.
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A couple walks along the beach in Playas De Tijuana during the National Emergency.
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Construction workers step into Mexico through a panel they removed during the National Emergency.
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A construction worker ties string onto a spool through the border wall panel his team has removed during the National Emergency. US Customs and Border Patrol is nowhere in sight.
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A section of the border wall in Tijuana, Mexico. The art reads “What about the Mexican dream?”
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Concertina wire as seen through the border wall on Playas De Tijuana.
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A border patrol vehicle seen late at night through the border wall near Friendship Park.
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Razor wire as seen through the border wall on Playas De Tijuana.